Search
Search type

Confucius Institute

Mid-Autumn Festival

6 October 2015

This year the Confucius Institute celebrated the Mid-Autumn Festival, also known as the Moon Festival by giving somebody the chance to win a course of their choice. Do you know what is behind the different names of the festival?

This year the Confucius Institute celebrated the Mid-Autumn Festival, also known as the Moon Festival by giving somebody the chance to win a course of their choice. Do you know what is behind the different names of the festival?

Mid-Autumn Festival falls on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month, the exact middle of autumn. In ancient time, Chinese people used to offer elaborately-made cakes for the moon spirits during that day. After making a symbolic offering, a family would enjoy eating the cakes together. Thus the meaning of the festival has gradually changed to one of a happy family reunion. This custom has been carried forward from generation to generation.

There is also a legendary story in relation to the festival. Children are told there is a fairy lady-Chang’e on the moon, who lives in a spacious but cold crystal palace with her sole companion being a jade rabbit. A heavenly general and friend would pay her a visit occasionally, bringing her his fragrant wine. She would then perform a beautiful dance. The shadow on the moon made the story all the more credible and fascinating to the young imaginative minds. In the mid-autumn evening, the moon is full and bright. During the night those who are far away from their homes are likely to feel homesick when they look up at the luminous moon.

Return to the full list of news stories.